Eyes Say More Than Words

“How the heck do you make eye exams and optometry interesting? There’s nothing sexy about an optician.”

-Pum Lefebure, CCO, Design Army

Advertising does the impossible by using storytelling to make even the most mundane things feel magical.  In Eyes Say More Than Words, the Quietest Library on Earth silence is protected by the “Quiet Guard” who shushes all sounds from the clicking of heels, to chewing of gum, and even wind created by the waving of arms.  The library’s patrons use their quaintly adorned eyes to start a revolution against him. They use an elaborate code or winks, glances, and eyebrow raises to create a mutiny for expression while showing off their elaborate eyeglasses.

The spot is glorious.  The beautiful old fashioned library, the wild yet classy designer clothes, the “unparallelled fashionable frames,” and the exoticly compelling narrations come together perfectly.  

The campaign takes it even further: “The world has become noisy with ineffective distractions and opinions,” says Pum Lefebure, Design Army’s chief creative officer. “It’s time to silence the noise (a bit) and join the silent revolution to hear and think more before we put it out there. Speak Less. See More.” You can actually “Join the Revolution” on Georgetown Optitian’s website.

Having grown up around Georgetown, I never thought I would read about a place I used to walk by on the way to Starbucks.  I think it is brave of an optometrist to take the initiative to have great advertising, and it has seriously paid off. This is just the latest in a series of cutting edge, weird and fantastic ads for Georgetown Optician by Design Army.I am so impressed with how Design Army managed to make Georgetown Optician so badass.  Georgetowners are posh and scrupulous. To create a world for them where eyeglass-wearing becomes electric and aspirational is optimal in the creative world. 

The Michelob Marathon

The Michelob Marathon is Spotify’s first dynamic audio campaign. Spotify uses personal streaming history, intensity of your run, and where you live to create a very specialized playlist with oddly specific targeted ads for Michelob, even including the weather where you’re running.  The customer then has the opportunity to redeem prizes for their run.  

This is not the first time Michelob Ultra has targeted runners.  In 2017, they launched a “Rock ‘n’ Roll Marathon” campaign where they sponsored races and cycling events all over the US.  

Tim Deeks, marketing manager for Michelob Ultra, said: “With Michelob Ultra, we want to inspire people to live an active lifestyle and the Michelob Marathon with Spotify is a great platform to do so.”  

Every beer company has a personality in advertising.  Bud Light owns using humor, Coors Light owns cold, Corona owns the beach. . . So, does this mean that Michelob Ultra owns exercise? Not what you would expect from a beer brand- it is bold and sets Michelob apart. 

The Whopper Detour

The Whopper Detour, brought to us by FCB New York, is what we live for as creatives.  Effectively, this glorified coupon more than doubled Burger King’s mobile sales. They told customers to go to McDonald’s and download the Burger King app, order a 1 ¢ Whopper, then go to Burger King to pick it up.

What I love about this campaign is the drama.  It gets you thinking “wow, did Burger King really just own McDonald’s like that?” They perfectly executed digital marketing in a really unapologetic way.  Creativity can fall flat on the digital side by getting overly complicated, The Whopper Detour is personal, differentiating, and “Pokemon Go”-kind-of fun.  

At the same time, it is traditional.  By walking over to McDonald’s, you have earned your Whopper coupon.  Just like standing outside the competition’s store and directing them away, but more magical.  

Fernando Machado, global CMO of Burger King, said it best: “that’s the power of an idea.”  Because of FCB NY’s creativity, this wasn’t just some smug attempt to get customers away from McDonald’s.  It “bent logic” and made the Whopper the people’s priority.

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑